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FUTURE OF SHOPPING IS BRICKS & CLICKS –
Interview with Will in The Times

William Higham, founder of futurist agency Next Big Thing, says “If there is any point in shops now, then it’s just to do what you can’t do online: to interact. Which is why we’re seeing the merger of retail, hospitality, entertainment and education, with an element of ‘gamification’.” … In the future, shopping does not necessarily have to be a …

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Second Life Crisis? –
Interview with will in daily mail

“Analyst William Higham, of trend forecasters Next Big Thing, said life was becoming more complicated in modern Britain.”Once we could all expect a simple trajectory,” he said. “We’d meet a partner, move in with them, raise children and then retire together. Now, although we may begin one life, we are increasingly ending that first life and starting a second life …

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RETURN OF THE BEARD –
INTERVIEW WITH WILL IN FINANCIAL TIMES

William Higham, of the trend-forecasting agency Next Big Thing, believes the beard is a reaction against the idea of the metrosexual, “but without going back to a very macho world. It expresses a need to break away from the humdrum existence of sitting at desks in front of computers.” … Grooming expert Carmelo Guastella, creative director of the London spa …

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The search for cool is hot work –
FEATURE ON WILL in The Guardian

“It’s not just about what trousers the kids are wearing,” says William. “It’s about what this says about their attitudes, and where they are going. If they are wearing combat trousers, what does that say about their state of mind and about what they’re likely to be doing next year?” Seeking out the trends as they happen is the latest …

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how awesome was last week? –
Interview with will in fast company

“Nostalgia bypasses intellect and reaches straight to the heart,” says William Higham, a consumer strategist who has helped brands like the BBC and Universal Music leverage nostalgia. “It makes you feel emotional toward the brand.” … For its 10-year-anniversary earlier this year, Facebook automatically generated a “look back” video for each of its users. With slides announcing such monumental events …

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Monarchy and housing will remain –
Interview with Will in Daily Express

Trends expert William Higham said: “Britons expect – and want – British staples like the monarchy, the BBC, marriage and pubs to continue. But we have embraced innovations like mobile phones, cash machines, fast food, trainers and coffee chains as new traditions we expect to continue in future.” The monarchy is such an important part of our way of life …

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How we’ll buy property in 2025 –
Interview with will in city AM

“Estate agents will supply their own branded HUD glasses, loaded with many different apps connected to dozens of databases, to enable home- buyers to virtually redesign or practise DIY on any property they are viewing,” says futurist William Higham. … Dashing across town to visit a property for sale after work? According to trend analysts, the days of paying a …

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are men in ads becoming idiots? –
interview with will in times of india

William Higham, a trend forecaster with The Next Big Thing, observes people’s behaviour for clients such as BSkyB and AOL.He points out ads have been reflecting a “flux” in the roles of the sexes since 1969 and Saatchi & Saatchi’s famous “pregnant man” ad. “Men in particular are suffering from a kind of identity crisis,” Higham says. “They are not …

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Craft is all the rage –
Interview with will in sunday times

William Higham, of trend forecasters Next Big Thing, calls it “traditionalising”, arguing that it’s not just about home accessories, but a renewal of interest in skills and crafts, utility, simplicity and formality: “Books and media on ‘lost’ crafts are more popular than ever. Fashion designers are focusing on tailoring and cut. Club promoters are adding cake stalls to their offerings.” …

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Experts predict the latest trends –
Interview with will in Holland Herald

“William Higham believes that the young are showing “old” behaviour patterns: “The younger generation now are risk-averse,” he says. “It’s a reaction against their parents.” With increasing choices within their grasp, women are becoming “amazons, not bimbos,” in the memorable words of leading trend predictor Li Edelkoort, while men are, “Figuring out their role now there are so many female …